What are the Penalties for a New Jersey Cell Phone Violation?

When you get behind the wheel of a car, it is your duty to follow every single rule and regulation of the road. These laws are in place for a reason, which is primarily driver safety. In a world where seemingly 5 out of every 10 motorists can be seen glancing downward at their phones at any given time, it is your job to ensure you are not one of them. The number one cause of all fatal car accidents is not drunk driving but distracted driving. Nobody believes you are a bad person for simply checking your phone, but you must understand you are unknowingly endangering everyone around you. However, people are charged with cell phone violations virtually every day, and if you are one of those people, you most likely have several questions. Please read on to learn more about cell phone violations in the state of New Jersey.

What are the potential consequences of a New Jersey cell phone violation?

New Jersey courts have become increasingly impatient with distracted drivers, so the consequences you face may be severe. If this is your first-offense cell phone violation, you may be looking at a fine ranging from $200 to $400. Second-time cell phone violators will face a fine anywhere from $400-$600. This may not sound like a lot, but if you are struggling financially, a $600 fine could set you back substantially. Lastly, if this is your third or subsequent cell phone violation, you will face a fine between $600-$800, as well as have 3 points added to your driving record. Points will impact your insurance premiums for years to come, which is an investment most people are not happy to make. This is why you must hire an aggressive attorney who will fight to get your charges lessened via plea bargain, or, in some cases, completely dropped. However, you should always keep in mind that these laws are in place to protect people–it is always the best policy to refrain from using a cellular device while driving.

Can I ever legally use a non-hands free device while driving?

You may use a cell phone without hands-free capabilities in certain select circumstances, and generally only if your life or another person’s life is at risk. For example, you can legally use a cell phone to report fires, car accidents, medical emergencies, a possible criminal act, road hazards, or a reckless/potentially drunk driver on the road. 

Contact our experienced New Jersey firm

If you or someone you know was charged with a cell phone violation, especially if this was your third or subsequent ticket, do yourself a favor and contact The Law Office of Kevin T. Conway today.

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